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TAG: archaeology

GIS helps archaeologists trace a mother’s journey

November 24, 2021By
White Sands has the largest collection of fossilized human footprints. (Photo: National Park Service)

“The tasks of paleontologists and classical historians and archaeologists are remarkably similar — to excavate, decipher and bring to life the tantalizing remnants of a time we will never see.” — Adrienne Mayor Heatwaves rose up from the dusty, dry, cracked ground. Tiny black flies buzzed around the team’s eyes and faces. The only shade was under a canopy erected... read more

Mapping Marvel: Lost cities found

October 11, 2021By
Image: F. Estada-Belli/Pacunam Lidar Initiative

GPS and airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) have revolutionized archaeology. In just a little more than a decade, dozens of previously hidden cities and settlements have been discovered under heavy tree canopy and in other terrain. Many of the sites are in difficult-to-access areas, such as high atop mountains, in vast deserts, or enclosed in thick, nearly impenetrable foliage.... read more

This article is tagged with and posted in Featured Stories, GSS Monthly, Lidar, Technology

Exploring Shetland’s uninhabited Kame of Isbister with GNSS and UAV

March 25, 2020By
3D model: The heatmap of the Kame of Isbister shows elevations and the archaeological site. (Image: Emlid)

The mysterious and fascinating Kame of Isbister is situated in Shetland’s north mainland near the North Roe. The location has been studied several times, including by the Extreme Archaeology TV series in 2003. The uninhabited grassland continues to attract explorers because of a series of secret structures. Those structures are hidden on the sea-faced slope and can’t be seen from the land nearby. One... read more

Drone aids archaeology in Scotland

April 22, 2019By
Five days of drone flights yielded 4,000 ultra-high-resolution images and 420 million data points. (Image: National Trust of Scotland/GeoGeo)

The National Trust for Scotland commissioned Glasgow-based GeoGeo to carry out a drone survey of the inner Hebridean islands of Canna and Sanday in November 2018. Using an ultra-high-definition camera, the GeoGeo team not only pinned down the exact locations of archaeological features, but also revealed new archaeological sites. Over five days, the drone navigated 400 kilometers to capture 4,000... read more

Can you dig it? Space archeology, virtual reality and GIS

April 28, 2016By

Using aerial photography and GIS technology, historians, archaeologists and environmental scientists are able to look into the past and determine what actually occurred. GIS can play a huge role in archeological projects, and with the integration of virtual reality, the possibilities are even more exciting. read more

Survey lasers in on Iron-Age archaeology

January 11, 2016By

High-tech aerial laser surveying is being employed to reveal the hidden archaeology of an Iron-Age hill settlement in Lancashire, England. Visually, the archaeological features are difficult to see, but a Bluesky laser survey, commissioned by the Morecambe Bay Partnership, is expected to reveal previously undiscovered details of a settlement at Warton Crag. Identified as an important Heritage at Risk site,... read more

This article is tagged with , , , , and posted in Featured Stories, GIS News, Lidar

Aerial mapping of Macchu Pichu: Drone helps preserve archaeological treasure

December 27, 2015By

High up in the Peruvian Andes Mountains lies Machu Picchu, an Incan citadel built in the 15th century, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the fall of 2014, Trimble demonstrated its UX5 Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) — along with the Trimble Business Center and Inpho UASMaster processing software — at the famed archaeological site. Machu Picchu is under the threat... read more

This article is tagged with , , , , , and posted in Featured Stories, GIS News, Mapping, Technology, UAS/UAV