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MicroSurvey CAD 2016 features new capabilities

January 11, 2016  - By 0 Comments

MicroSurvey Software has released MicroSurvey CAD 2016, the newest generation of its desktop survey and design program for land surveyors and civil engineers. Powered by a new IntelliCAD 8.1a engine and enhanced with a suite of new point-cloud management tools, the software makes high-impact drafting and design fast and intuitive, the company said.

MicroSurvey2016Users on multi-core computers will experience up to 300 percent faster performance compared to previous versions, which substantially improves productivity. Navigation has been enhanced through a new ribbon interface with high-resolution icons that provide easy access to frequently used tools. The newest version of the software is also able to open and export DGN files, handle annotation scaling, and publish drawings as DWF/DWFX, PNG and JPG files.

Point Clouds. The new release includes significant enhancements for working with point clouds. The Ultimate and Studio versions of the software are now powered by the same point-cloud engine that drives Leica Cyclone and CloudWorx software, making it possible to directly import Leica Cyclone and Leica JetStream databases using Cyclone dialogs.

Users can view panoramic photographs captured by the laser scanner and snap to points directly from the photographs in a TruSpace window. Point-cloud data is now displayed directly within the CAD model space.

MicroSurvey CAD is compatible with field data from all major total stations and data collectors and is fully compatible with AutoCAD; 64-bit and 32-bit versions are available.

Tracy Cozzens

About the Author:

Senior Editor Tracy Cozzens joined GPS World magazine in 2006. She also is editor of GPS World’s newsletters and the sister website Geospatial Solutions. She has worked in government, for non-profits, and in corporate communications, editing a variety of publications for audiences ranging from federal government contractors to teachers.

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