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Connect with Bluetooth GNSS Devices Using SuperSurv

February 19, 2015  - By 0 Comments

SuperSurv_measureTo meet the needs of high-accuracy field data collection and better workflow with modern GNSS technology, Supergeo’s latest SuperSurv GIS mapping app allows users to connect with and operate external Bluetooth GNSS devices. The app also elevates field-work efficiency with new averaging algorithms.

SuperSurv is designed for field data collection on Android and iOS-powered devices. Integrating with GIS and GPS technologies, SuperSurv provides functions like Map Display, Query, Measure, and supports to overlay OpenStreetMap as the basemap. Also, users can capture point, line and polygon features and attribute data, and save the data as SHP or GEO format in both offline and online modes.

With the new external GNSS device connection function, users can choose between internal positioning information and an outer GNSS source via Bluetooth. When pairing the GNSS receiver with an Android device, SuperSurv allows users to fully control and present detailed messages of navigation within system status. In addition, data collection via GNSS is enhanced with options such as a coordinate data averaging function or vertex collecting threshold, bringing users modernized and highly accurate field survey experience.

The external GNSS device connection and advanced data-collecting functions are fully supported and available with the SuperSurv Pro version. For SuperSurv M3 users, the newly added functions come as an optional plug-in that users can purchase and download.

Free trials of the software are available:
iTunes Store
Google Play

Tracy Cozzens

About the Author:

Senior Editor Tracy Cozzens joined GPS World magazine in 2006. She also is editor of GPS World’s newsletters and the sister website Geospatial Solutions. She has worked in government, for non-profits, and in corporate communications, editing a variety of publications for audiences ranging from federal government contractors to teachers.

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